Important Depression Info & Treatment Choices – How to Get Your Life Back

There is a lot of depression info out there. How do you sort through it all to find the treatment that is right for you? In this article, you will learn important facts about prescription drugs and natural remedies that will help you choose the best treatment. Once you get started on a treatment program, you will be able to take charge of your life.

The most advertised depression information is for prescription drugs, so you may think this is your only option, but this is simply not the case. Pharmaceutical companies have deep pockets and spend millions of dollars every year, teaching potential customers about their drugs. While these drugs are effective for some people, it’s important to understand that they do not heal the cause of depression, instead, they just suppress the symptoms. This is good news for the pharmaceutical companies because if you can find a drug that works for you, you are pretty much a customer for life.

While I’m not trying to knock depression info published by the drug companies, it’s important for you to be aware that they do have a vested interest in getting you on their drugs. After all, the recurring income they earn is one of the reasons they are the richest industry on earth.Fortunately, these companies are regulated by the government. At the end of every television commercial, they are required to list the potential side effects of their medications. Have you ever listened to one of these commercials and laughed because there were so many side effects listed, it seemed ridiculous to consider taking the drug? Well, it’s smart to pay attention to these side effects because in some people, they can worsen the symptoms of depression and even lead to suicide.

Currently, there are three types of drugs used for depression on the market: tricyclics, SSRIs, and MAOIs. Within each class of drug, there are a number of different drugs. Certain drugs work better for certain people and some people cannot tolerate the side effects of these drugs which can include sleep problems, stomach issues, lowered libido, weight gain, anxiety, heart issues and more. Also, some of these drugs can interact negatively with other drugs and supplemental hormones, so you need to ask your doctor about the interactions specific to that drug.

Further, what you won’t learn from the depression information out there is that in the scheme of human history, these drugs are relatively new. As such, the drug companies do not know the long term effects these drugs have on the brain. Since we know that there are short term effects, long term implications should be of primary concern.

It’s important for you to understand that it’s not your fault that you are suffering from depression. Life is stressful and sometimes, chronic stress depletes the feel-good neurochemicals in the brain that balance stress and help us regain our footing after difficult life events. But think about it: if your brain chemicals are depleted, doesn’t it make sense to build them back up again with nutrients that will help the brain to heal itself, rather than drugs that at best only suppress symptoms temporarily and can potentially make them worse?

For centuries, people have turned to proven herbs like St. John’s Wort and Passion Flower to alleviate depression and restore energy and vitality. When these herbs are delivered in a standardized formulation that ensures the same dose every time, they provide a gentle, but effective way to give the brain the nutrients it needs to heal and start producing those feel-good brain chemicals on its own. This is a healthy solution to all the depression info out there that leads you to believe that your only option is prescription drugs.Once you start taking a natural remedy and are feeling better, you will have the motivation to make small lifestyle changes that will continue to support a positive outlook and help you climb out of depression once and for all.

As the commercial says, “Depression hurts.” It hurts everyone who loves and depends on you, but it doesn’t have to be this way. It’s not your fault that you’re depressed, but now that you have the depression information needed to choose the best solution for yourself, you can take the first step in getting your life back.

Gallstone Dissolving Agents – Oral Drug

Type of Drug

Gallstone dissolving agent.

How the Drug Works

Ursodiol helps dissolve cholesterol gallstones. It is most effective if the gallstones are small or “floatable.” Patients must have a working gallbladder.

Uses

To dissolve cholesterol gallstones smaller than 20 mm in diameter in patients who are not good candidates for surgery because of systemic disease, advanced age, or reaction to general anesthesia.

For the prevention of gallstones in obese patients experiencing rapid weight loss.

Gallstone Recurrence: Treatment requires months of therapy. Complete dissolution does not always occur and recurrence with in 5 years has been observed in 50% or fewer patients. Consider alternative therapy if possible.

Pregnancy: There are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. Use only if clearly needed and the potential benefits outweigh the possible hazards to the fetus.Breastfeeding: It is not known if ursodiol appears in breast milk. Consult your doctor before you begin breastfeeding.

Children: Safety and effectiveness have not been established.

Lab tests will be required during treatment. Tests include liver function; analysis.

Drug Interactions

Tell your doctor or pharmacist if you are taking or planning to take any over ­ the-counter or prescription medications or dietary supplements with this drug. Drug doses may need to be modified or a different drug prescribed.

The following drugs and drug classes interact with this drug:

Antacids, Aluminum-based (eg, aluminum hydroxide)

Clofibrate (eg, Atromid-S)

Contraceptives, Oral (eg, Ortho-Novum)

Bile Acid Sequestrants (eg, cholestyramine)

Estrogens (eg, ethinyl estradiol)

Side Effects

Every drug is capable of producing side effects. Many patients experience no, or minor, side effects. The frequency and severity of side effects depend on many factors including dose, duration of therapy and individual susceptibility. Possible side effects include.

Digestive Tract: Nausea; vomiting; diarrhea; severe abdominal pain (especially in upper right side); indigestion; constipation; gas; gallbladder inflammation; inflammation of the mouth.

Nervous System: Headache; fatigue; anxiety; depression; sleep problems.

Skin: Rash; itching; hives; dry skin; sweating; hair thinning.

Other: Metallic taste; joint and muscle pain; cough; runny nose; back pain; mouth sores.

Guidelines for Use

Use exactly as prescribed. Otherwise, the gallstones may dissolve very slowly or not at all.If a dose is missed, take it as soon as possible. If several hours have passed or if it is nearing time for the next dose, do not double the dose in order to “catch up” (unless advised to do so by your doctor). If more than one dose is missed or it is necessary to establish a new dosage schedule, contact your doctor or pharmacist.

Carefully follow the diet your doctor has prescribed.

Contact your doctor if diarrhea, stomach pain, severe sudden pain in upper right side, nausea or vomiting occurs.

Therapy usually takes months. Complete dissolving of gallstones does not occur in all patients, and recurrence within 5 years occurs in up to 50% of patients.

The long-term effects (more than 24 months) of this medicine are not known.

Lab tests will be required to monitor therapy. Be sure to keep appointments.

Store below 86°F.

Medicare Supplement and Part D Drug Plans In Plain English

If you are about to turn 65, you, no doubt, have already signed up for Medicare or at least you’ve read the info about signing up. So the first question to resolve is should you get a Medicare supplement plan and prescription coverage from Part D or should you go into a Medicare Advantage plan?

For the sake of this article, let’s assume you already have your Medicare set up. So the next question becomes, now what? Medicare was easy, mostly because there’s only one place you can get it, namely, the federal government. After you have your Medicare in place, however, you’re only a third of the way done. Medicare covers 80% of your hospital and physician fees, but there are still two other health insurance plans you need.

Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans

The first is called Medicare supplement insurance, and it does exactly what its name implies. It supplements your Medicare plan. What that means in plain English is that your Medicare supplement insurance pays the difference between what Medicare pays, which in most cases is 80%, and the total amount of your hospital and doctor bills.

So far it’s all pretty easy to understand, right? Medicare pays 80% and your supplement insurance plan pays the remaining 20%, assuming you choose the right plan. But this is where the major private insurance companies come into the picture and make it as difficult as possible for the average person to understand. Each year they come up with different Medicare supplement plans to choose from, they assign them each a letter of the alphabet so, assumingly, you can tell them apart. IN 2010, for example, at the time of this writing, Medicare supplement plans A through N are available, except for E, H, I, and J, which are no longer available.Medicare Part D Drug Plans

The major private insurance companies offer several part D drug plans to choose from. The difference here from plan to plan is in the amount of your deductable, which can range from no deductable at all to a $310. Your deductable, of course, is the total amount you must spend yourself on prescription drugs before your coverage kicks in. The lower your deductable, the higher the monthly premium you pay. So with zero deductable, you’ll pay the highest monthly premium. There’s also something called gap coverage that you’ll need to understand, because after your coverage kicks in, either at zero or $310, when your total prescription drug cost reaches $2700 per calendar year, the major insurance companies actually stop paying until your total drug cost reaches $4350. Again, these figures are based on 2010 plans at the time of this writing, and so, are subject to change. My insurance agent advised that this will become perfectly clear if you think of the coverage gap as a donut hole, as it’s sometimes called.

What The Major Private Insurance Companies Don’t Want You To Know

The major private insurance companies are not likely to tell you that the government requires each insurance company to offer exactly the same Medicare supplement and Part D drug plans within each specific state.

What this means in plain English is that Medicare supplement plans A through N, for example in Texas, must have exactly the same features from each insurance company. In other words, Plan A from one provider must be exactly the same as plan A from any other provider. Plan B from one provider must be exactly the same as Plan B from any other provider, and so on.

The good news is that if you find supplement plans A through N a bit difficult to understand, at least you’ll only have to understand them once because each letter plan must be exactly the same from one insurance company to the next.

With regard to Part D Drug plans, the same holds true. Each provider offers three Part D drug plans to choose from, sometimes referred to as good, better, and best, but the federal government also requires each of those plans to be exactly the same from one provider to another.

How to Choose the Right Medicare Supplement and Drug Plan

Because each specific plan must be exactly the same from one provider to the next your first step is to choose the best Medicare supplement plan (A-N) and the best Medicare Part D drug plan for your specific needs and situation.

While defining each plan (A-N) goes beyond the scope of this article, I will make a few suggestions of what to look for. Also keep in mind that although the individual plans may change from year to year, the one constant is that whatever Plan A is from one provider, Plan A from any of the others is required to be exactly the same.

Last year, for example, I chose Medicare Supplement Plan F and a $310.00 deductable drug plan. As you’re only able to change plans in a small window of time, which this year is from November 15th through December 31st, it’s important to choose the right plans from the beginning. So far so good with both. My Plan F has actually covered the full 20% in every instance and my drug plan is looking like it was the right choice as well, especially after I met my deductable. Even before, however, my drug plan was getting me discounted prices on non-generic prescription drugs.So, to recap, if each individual plan is exactly the same from one company to another, how do you choose the right insurance company?

First you learn everything you can about each of the individual plans from your independent health insurance agent, which makes choosing the right health insurance agent your first priority. You need a licensed, experienced agent who will take the time to explain the various plans in a way that you can understand.

Next, customer service will vary from company to company, so word of mouth, either good or bad, can help you decide. Because past history is the best predictor of future results, consider past experiences with the claim or customer service department either you or someone you know may have had with any of the major insurance companies.

And finally, now that you know that all plans must be exactly the same from one company to another, why not go with the company that offers the lowest monthly premiums, assuming, of course, that it’s a national brand that you’ve heard of?

In other words, if company A, the one that sends you a mailing every other day for three months before you turn 65 until three months after, charges a lot more than company B for exactly the same coverage, then why not go with company B?